Resources

Are you involved in an organisation operating in Victoria that assists individuals with a disability and/or their family and friends. Please use our contact page to let us know about you and we may place a link to your organisation on our website.

National Disability Insurance Scheme – NDIS

NDIS Logo

NDIS is the National Disability Insurance Scheme – a new way of providing community linking and individualised support for people with permanent and significant disability, their families and carers.

http://www.ndis.gov.au/

Travel Training

Travel Training

Need to travel train people who have an intellectual disability and wondering how to go about it? Here you will find an excellent resource that may be of use to you.
Click here to download PDF ›

Disability Services Commissioner – Victoria

DSC Logo

The Disability Services Commissioner was established on 1 July 2007 under the Disability Act 2006 to improve services for people with a disability in Victoria through assisting in the resolution of complaints raised by or on behalf of people who receive services.


http://odsc.vic.gov.au/

Department of Human Services (DHS) – Victoria

DHSvictoria_logo

Financial assistance, accommodation options, community involvment and other supports and services for people with a disability, their families and carers.

http://www.dhs.vic.gov.au/for-individuals/disability

Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) – Tasmania

DHHS header-logo

Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) manages and delivers health and wellbeing services for all Tasmanians.

http://www.dhhs.tas.gov.au/

CSA is a registered provider with DHHS (Tasmania). This means that we are required to report to DHHS on various issues such as serious incidents, allegations of abuse, and restrictive interventions, relating to our partners. Please refer to the below links if you would like more information on these topics:

1  |  Serious incidents

DHHS requires CSA to have systems and processes in place to appropriately manage and monitor serious incidents involving our partners and/or that impact on our organisation’s capacity to deliver services to our partners, in a consistent and co-ordinated manner. Click here for information on DHHS’s serious incident policy.

What is a serious incident? Click here for a detailed list. Some examples of serious incidents include, accidents and unexpected events that occur during delivery of a service that lead to harm or suffering, loss or damage to a person such as injury or admission to hospital, or theft or fraud.

What should you do if a serious incident occurs? If a serious incident occurs, you can tell CSA about it and we can either pass the information onto the relevant people from DHHS for you, or tell you how to contact the relevant people from DHHS. DHHS may need to follow up with you to talk about what happened and what can be done to prevent it happening again.

2  |  Reporting abuse

DHHS requires CSA to have systems and processes in place to prevent and report abuse involving our partners and/or that impact on our organisation’s capacity to deliver services to our partners, in a consistent and co-ordinated manner. Click here for DHHS’s abuse policy.

What is considered ‘abuse’? Abuse is generally anything that results in a violation of a person’s human or civil rights. There are five main types of abuse: physical, sexual, emotional / psychological, neglect and financial abuse. Abuse can be one off or persist over a period of time.

What should you do if one of our partners is being abused? If you are aware of, or need to report, an allegation of abuse, you can tell CSA about it and we can either pass the information onto the relevant people from DHHS for you, or tell you how to contact the relevant people from DHHS. DHHS may need to follow up with you to talk about what has happened and what needs to happen next.

3  |  Restrictive interventions

DHHS requires CSA to have systems and processes in place to ensure that the inherent dignity and individual autonomy, including the freedom to make choices, of our partners are respected. Click here for DHHS’s restrictive interventions policy, which CSA is required to comply with.

What are ‘restrictive interventions’? Restrictive interventions are any action(s) that are taken to restrict the rights or freedom of movement of our partners for the primary purpose of the behavioural control of them. These types of restrictive, aversive, and intrusive interventions are prohibited unless they have been authorised.

What should you do if one of our partners is being subjected to ‘restrictive interventions’? CSA has a ‘duty of care’ to protect our partners. If you are aware of, or need to report a restrictive intervention allegation, you can tell CSA about it and we can either pass the information onto the relevant people from DHHS, or tell you how to contact the relevant people from DHHS. DHHS may need to follow up with you to talk about what has happened and what needs to happen next.